Renewable energy for the economy engine

Alternative_Energies[1]An economy is like an engine. Nothing that just comes and goes in unpredictable cycles. If the economy is “high” it basically means it fires on all cylinders. If it is low, it runs at low speed, maybe spotty, maybe some get even stuck. Obviously their are many moving part in such an economy engine but one thing is for certain – it needs energy – ongoingly because even an economy is no self propelling wonder thing.

 

What can we learn from the energy industry?

Renewable energy is the ultimate key to success. If an economy is built on raw material that comes out of the dirt, well, that economy has a very defined life cycle. Like energy, also an economy need to have a resource that is renewable!!! If it is built based on the fact that a country is simply hot to catch-up with others, it makes a lot of sense, till the day it is there. If an economy is built based on ridiculously low credits, well it will break one point, or based on the fact that a country prints millions of dollars per day… Like anything that needs energy, also an economy needs a renewable resource.

We do need a renewable energy to fuel an economy day in and day out. The best renewable energy we have today are – believe it or not – start-ups. Start-ups create new products and services, which in turn creates possibly all new markets.  Start-ups work by breaking all rules, not caring about a past, not worried about structures and all the cumbersome aspects of a large global behemoth. As a result: Start-ups are the ultimate innovators. Over a million start-ups  exist around the planet and innovate – every single one of them.  Start-ups are the key to an economically healthy nation. May more start-ups propel our economy.

What Society3 can do for start-ups

Start-ups need money and there is actually plentiful available from VCs, Angels and industrial investors. Start-ups need a place to work from and ideally have a seeding ground where they can tap into many adjacent resources; Incubators are a great place to get that service.

Once the first prototype is developed, very quickly start-ups need to get their great innovation to as many users as possible. No matter what they developed, medical devices, new types of batteries, software, hardware, new pharmaceuticals or just new ways to do other things, most start-ups lack of the marketing power, the budgets and even the ideas how to bring those new things to the market. More importantly they need to develop trust so that those who are naturally skeptic begin to consider what the start-ups created.

S3-Buzz can help them, get the word out, at a near zero budget and actually develop trust through their friends and advocates. As a company  we decided to support start-ups from around the world as much as we can. We provide our technology at the lowest possible price and even develop additional services to help them grow. We believe helping start-ups grow is as important for the economy as finding renewable energy for the industry.

We put together a  Startup Buzz Program  and make it available immediately. It may have some kings we need to fix but we believe we better get going now.

@AxelS

 

P.S. If you like it, please help buzzing about it

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Buzz Case Study — Blog Post Amplification

buzz case study, s3buzz case study, society3After creating over 50 Buzz campaigns and supporting over 150 more in 2013, I have been able to watch the product develop into a robust application with a variety of uses. Campaigns focused on awareness and educating the public tend to fare very well, especially for corporate events and conferences; Buzzes that try to “sell”, or clients that have an expectation of guaranteed sales using Buzz technology, often encounter disappointing results.

One area of proven success in Buzz technology is blog post amplification. Using six original blog posts with their respective headlines as the Buzz Story, I created six different Buzz campaigns to see if I could boost views and mentions of the various articles. Two of them are featured in the comparison below.

Using the recently introduced Buzz Analytics for paid VIP members and campaigns over $500, I found an interesting correlation between the number of CTA (Call-to-Action) URL visits to each post and the setting of the Buzz Repeat Rate, which throttles the campaign at 3, 6, 12 and 24-hour intervals depending on your preference.

This is the first Buzz case study of two that look at the power of Buzz for blog post amplification.

Post 1: “Giving Thanks to the Buzz Community”150,000 Credits

[9 Day Campaign -- from December 2 to December 10 -- 3-Hour Repeat Rate]

This Thanksgiving-inspired post had an unbelievable launch thanks to the Buzz community, but it only lasted for one week. I published it on a Sunday afternoon in San Francisco and launched a “100 Mention” campaign to support it.

For reference, December 2 was the Monday after the holiday weekend in the U.S. — apparently a good day to post. 700 click-throughs in the first day for a total of 1750 click-throughs in about 8 days, with 70 additional (free) visits even after the campaign was complete.

What I learned: my Buzz repeat rate was too frequent (every 3 hours), resulting in several ambitious advocates mentioning the post 3 or more times on 6 different social platforms in just one day. This skewed the overall CTR (click-through rate) heavily, which translated to a concentration of click-throughs on Monday, December 2 and only a tenth of the click-throughs the following Monday, December 9.

Post 2: “How Much Are Shoppers Spending on Gifts?”150,000 Credits

[17 Days -- Dec 5 to Dec 22 with 7-Day Break and 6-Hour Repeat Rate]

This Buzz performed much better for two reasons. First, I chose a 6-hour repeat rate versus the 3-hour repeat rate of the previous Buzz example. By doing so, I spread out the number of available advocate actions (mentions) in a more even manner over time. Second, I reloaded the campaign with more credits 2 weeks later, reviving the viewership on the blog post as we neared Christmas, hitting its highest click-through day of 228 on the last day of the campaign.

But here’s the major find: even though I spent the same amount of credits on this Buzz campaign versus the one for the “Giving Thanks” blog post150,000 Credits – I received triple the number of mentions (1035 vs 345) and nearly double the number of advocates (115 vs 68) within an additional 2 more weeks by spreading out the campaign via the 6-hour Buzz Repeat Rate and dividing the campaign into 2 parts.

Best of all, with the same budget as the first campaign, I maintained a high total click-through count for the Buzz (1402 vs 1750) over a three-week period with a week break in the middle, rather than a heavy concentration of click-throughs in just a few days.

What I learned: A few simple changes to your Buzz can go a long way. Each of these campaigns would retail for about $100, but I certainly got more bang for my buck with the spread-out strategy of the 2nd Buzz.

PRO TIP: With a VIP membership ($199), you get 2,000 credits a day along with Buzz Analytics for every Buzz you create. Highly recommended.

 Please contact Rob Nielsen with any Buzz strategy questions.

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