Buzz Case Study — Blog Post Amplification

buzz case study, s3buzz case study, society3After creating over 50 Buzz campaigns and supporting over 150 more in 2013, I have been able to watch the product develop into a robust application with a variety of uses. Campaigns focused on awareness and educating the public tend to fare very well, especially for corporate events and conferences; Buzzes that try to “sell”, or clients that have an expectation of guaranteed sales using Buzz technology, often encounter disappointing results.

One area of proven success in Buzz technology is blog post amplification. Using six original blog posts with their respective headlines as the Buzz Story, I created six different Buzz campaigns to see if I could boost views and mentions of the various articles. Two of them are featured in the comparison below.

Using the recently introduced Buzz Analytics for paid VIP members and campaigns over $500, I found an interesting correlation between the number of CTA (Call-to-Action) URL visits to each post and the setting of the Buzz Repeat Rate, which throttles the campaign at 3, 6, 12 and 24-hour intervals depending on your preference.

This is the first Buzz case study of two that look at the power of Buzz for blog post amplification.

Post 1: “Giving Thanks to the Buzz Community”150,000 Credits

[9 Day Campaign -- from December 2 to December 10 -- 3-Hour Repeat Rate]

This Thanksgiving-inspired post had an unbelievable launch thanks to the Buzz community, but it only lasted for one week. I published it on a Sunday afternoon in San Francisco and launched a “100 Mention” campaign to support it.

For reference, December 2 was the Monday after the holiday weekend in the U.S. — apparently a good day to post. 700 click-throughs in the first day for a total of 1750 click-throughs in about 8 days, with 70 additional (free) visits even after the campaign was complete.

What I learned: my Buzz repeat rate was too frequent (every 3 hours), resulting in several ambitious advocates mentioning the post 3 or more times on 6 different social platforms in just one day. This skewed the overall CTR (click-through rate) heavily, which translated to a concentration of click-throughs on Monday, December 2 and only a tenth of the click-throughs the following Monday, December 9.

Post 2: “How Much Are Shoppers Spending on Gifts?”150,000 Credits

[17 Days -- Dec 5 to Dec 22 with 7-Day Break and 6-Hour Repeat Rate]

This Buzz performed much better for two reasons. First, I chose a 6-hour repeat rate versus the 3-hour repeat rate of the previous Buzz example. By doing so, I spread out the number of available advocate actions (mentions) in a more even manner over time. Second, I reloaded the campaign with more credits 2 weeks later, reviving the viewership on the blog post as we neared Christmas, hitting its highest click-through day of 228 on the last day of the campaign.

But here’s the major find: even though I spent the same amount of credits on this Buzz campaign versus the one for the “Giving Thanks” blog post150,000 Credits – I received triple the number of mentions (1035 vs 345) and nearly double the number of advocates (115 vs 68) within an additional 2 more weeks by spreading out the campaign via the 6-hour Buzz Repeat Rate and dividing the campaign into 2 parts.

Best of all, with the same budget as the first campaign, I maintained a high total click-through count for the Buzz (1402 vs 1750) over a three-week period with a week break in the middle, rather than a heavy concentration of click-throughs in just a few days.

What I learned: A few simple changes to your Buzz can go a long way. Each of these campaigns would retail for about $100, but I certainly got more bang for my buck with the spread-out strategy of the 2nd Buzz.

PRO TIP: With a VIP membership ($199), you get 2,000 credits a day along with Buzz Analytics for every Buzz you create. Highly recommended.

 Please contact Rob Nielsen with any Buzz strategy questions.

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Using the S3 Timeline and Buzz Etiquette

S3Buzz, S3 TimelineA handful of new features in the S3 dashboard have made a real difference in the way our Buzz community communicates with each other.

To illustrate this point, we reached out on the S3 timeline and received a helpful list of Buzz tips from Susan Connor of Clear Vision Enterprises in Australia.

It’s always fun to hear guidance from users who have been testing out the product since its inception. Susan is an avid user of Buzz technology and continues to be one of our most helpful community members and beta testers, having been in our world since the early days of XeeMe.

Thanks to Susan for her insight! Be sure to connect with her here.

—————————————————————————————————————————-

1) Use the S3 timeline to your advantage.

One of the best improvements to the S3 dashboard (where the Buzz app is accessed) has been the addition of a public, Facebook-like timeline.

When you create a Buzz, the public timeline will automatically post an update to let the community know that your campaign is ready for action.

The S3 timeline is a great place to post a question or link for other community members, and offers an excellent opportunity to connect with someone on all of their social networks via their XeeMe profile.

S3 Dashboard Timeline, Society3

2) Listen for feedback.

Our community will offer suggestions to a Buzz Master whose Buzz story could be improved or corrected.

Be sure to check the S3 timeline, as well as the main Buzz Facebook Group, during the few hours after you launch a Buzz.

Acknowledging advice from others will strengthen trust within the community and help you build your own team of advocates.

S3Buzz, S3 Timeline, Feedback

3) Notify the Buzz Master directly if a Buzz has a flaw.

On each Buzzlet, you’ll see who organized the campaign. Clicking on their name will lead to their XeeMe profile, where you can leave them a note. This is a more discreet way of letting someone know they might have made an error. Otherwise, a public timeline notification is perfectly fine.

4) There’s a difference between the qualitative and quantitative results of a Buzz.

Focus on working with supporters who offer real value and authenticity online. There can be a tendency to focus solely on the number of mentions in a Buzz, but don’t forget the fine line between amplification and spam. Don’t compromise your reputation and risk getting banned on certain networks.

Susan holds a personal belief as a community developer: individuals can experience “prestige loss if trust factors are broken.”

Measure qualitative results in a Buzz (the quality of the supporter network and the level of teamwork) versus quantitative results (relying solely on the number of Buzz mentions as a success metric) carefully. A focus on the latter risks spamming your audience for short-term gain.

S3 Buzz, S3 Buzz Analytics

5) Follow the golden rule.

“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

If you are invited and commit to a Buzz Team, make sure to do your part and support that Buzz Master whenever a new Buzz is released.

When you access a Buzz from your Xee Notes, there is a benefit to the Buzz Master as well as to you as the Buzz supporter (aka Warrior).

6) If you have made a mistake, you can pause or terminate the Buzz.

Unlike a traditional advertising campaign, the Buzz story can be edited on-the-fly, and Buzz campaigns can be paused or terminated altogether, which will refund the credits you have remaining in the campaign.

7) Rome wasn’t built in a day.

Buzz is an incredible driver of mentions and reach, but occasionally there’s a hiccup in the system. Speak up if you see something wonky — chances are, it’ll benefit the whole community. Shout to @S3Grp on Twitter.

Learn more about Buzz best practices here.

Our thanks again to Susan Connor!

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Buzz Campaign – A case study

Businesses of all sizes have the same challenge: How to get more people talk about their brand, products, or events. No this is not really new. What is new though, is the fact that today approximately 80% of all purchase decisions are based on mentions and recommendations. Also roughly 80% of event attendees  join any given event based on mentions and recommendations. And there is no difference between B2B or B2C. Growing mentions and recommendations are now becoming strategic objectives for today’s marketing engagement.

Case Study OpenStack Conference

Cloud computing with open source technology isn’t exactly a consumer topic and it isn’t really sexy either. The job was to stimulate discussions and outbuzz everybody. Easier said than done because there are industry heavyweights like HP and Rackspace competing for attention and mind share as well. And a competing event, organized by 800 pound gorilla Amazon was already introduces as “Cloud War” by the tech press. The Redhat team however was equipped with the new S3 Buzz Technology that was created to stimulate massive engagement in a way that was not possible before. The new technology allows its users to disseminate short tweet size text blocks to business friends, partners and customers with the goal to share those and stimulate conversations. Friends of friends of friends can obviously respond, comment and share it further with others. Everything with a push of a button and a robust management system with analytics to manage the progress of the campaign in real time. With a very agile partner organization that has already

TwetterRS-RH-02

been motivated to engage online, mentions and reach grew instantly

SiliconAnglePost

and rapidly. On the second conference day the discussions reached the „Top News“ status on Twitter and conventional media reported „Redhat steals the show at OpenStack Summit…“.

 

What exactly happened?
Within only three days we created over 100 pieces of content based on known presentations, known speaker and topics and formed them to 140 character long information snippets, ready to communicate. The content was entered into the S3 Buzz System. Every partner and friend of the company as well as speakers and sponsors had access to the Buzz page and could share the content easily with their network, with a single click. The mostly highly interesting content was quickly picked up by others and re-shared. While the conference was in full swing, we communicated live by introducing the current speakers, what they present and also reactions from the audience. The short and fast content distribution was easy to read and easy to follow. Business partners and buzz teams where in stand by for new content and actually provided a never ending information stream throughout the day. Intrigued IT professionals from around the world picked up the news stream on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+ and began to ask questions, provided comments and shared the info with their network. In just a few hours over 5,000 people outside the conference were involved in topics and conversations. Obviously, partner and buzz team was busy to engage, respond or re-rout questions to the respective experts all in real time.

S3-RH-Openstack-post-buzz

The conference made history. Not only with the participating parties, but it was a proof of concept for the effectiveness of Buzz campaigns and its ability to reach markets like no other media. After day 2 the conference had a reach of nearly 30 Million.

Summary

Buzz campaigns evolve to a strategic marketing tool that is capable of improving sales productivity by allowing sales teams to point to the customer voice instead of bluntly promoting the product themselves. Brand reputation is taking an all new height when a market is no longer discussing only problems but sharing exciting news and participating in conversations around the world. Compared to conventional awareness creation marketing, Buzz creates real customer engagement with a positive long term effect to brand sentiments and brand reputation. More details are presented at the upcoming webinar Nov 19.

@AxelS

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Managing different client accounts without logging in and out

multiChrome

Social media managers or agencies are challenged with juggling many different social media accounts. You need to log into this twitter account than that twitter account, back to Facebook then LinkedIn and so forh – all from one browser. And all of a sudden ….ouuuch you posted to the wrong account.

Google Chrome has a powerful feature, that is not widely known.

You can create several different and independent instances of Chrome and just click on the respective browser icon to be in the respective account. Yes, it maintains the session, keeps the cookies and everything you need to have dedicated to that account. It’s like a different browser.

 

Here is what you need to do:

1) Create a subdirectory on your computer for each account i.e.

C:/chrome/client1
C:/chrome/client2
C:/chrome/client3
(Use the backslash of course)

2) Create copies of your Chrome Link Button on your Desktop

3) Add this code extention to the TARGET definition after ….chrome.exe

-user-data-dir=C:\Chrome\society3

ChromeSettings

 

Now you can login into the various accounts and stay logged in. Just click on the respective icon. Each chrome instances you have setup that way keeps their own cookies and sessions. :)

Happy switching

Axel
http://XeeMe.com/AxelS
(my entire online presence)

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Social Media Managers Keep Failing

Society3-SM-keep-failingNo question, those who studied the shift in our socioeconomic landscape come all to the same conclusion: Social Media holds a massive change for our society and our businesses. The change will be as profound as the industrial revolution 200 years ago.

Introducing that change to executives who run their business with a huge daily pressure is so overwhelming that it is a very natural behavior to go into denial. You hear “The more things change, the more they stay the same”, “I don’t see an immediate ROI”, “My fellow executives from other companies aren’t using Social Media either”… The reasons to ignore it are most likely equally diverse as the reasons to ignore the development of cities and companies 200 years ago.  My personal prediction is that it may take well another 5 to 10 years for the majority of businesses to recognize the impact of that change and what it means to their business. And the more people warn “If you don’t adopt, you will fall through the cracks”, the less likely business executives will even listen.

Denial is a mechanic of our psyche that sets in when the amount of information or the degree of danger is so large that the brain is not able to comprehend it.  So here is why Social Media Managers keep failing:

1) Thousands of people – like you and me – have gone through a learning curve, comprehending the seismic shift in our business society. But it took us a year or more of learning and thinking to get there. Most who began to recognize the shift are pounding on business leaders to recognize it too and get ready for change.

2) A business executive who is very focused on keeping the company or their division afloat and fighting on all ends for growth and profitability, competing in a taught global economy, has probably less time to even start comprehending the change. And the more people talk about apocalyptic business erosion the more those managers go into denial.

Even though people get hired to ‘manage’ Social Media – to many have zero pull through in their respective organizations and remain to be an alibi function for executives to be able to say “Oh yes, we did invest in social media, we even have a management position and doing it for quite a while. We are totally covered”.

In a recent research we asked 100 companies about their social media engagement and 72% confirmed that they are very active and happy with their results, 21% are exploring social media but will not engage before middle of next year and 17% stated that they don’t see a benefit and therefor have no plans to engage.

Now – checking out the level of engagement of the 72%, is very easy because everything is public and very transparent. We realized that nearly 80% of those 72% have only a very rudimentary presence, very low engagement level with customer and inquires or questions unanswered for weeks. Only a small group has actually recognized the opportunity and developed a highly engaging online presence with apparently very active customers.

The larger part of social media managers apparently work heads down, trying to keep a low profile (and the job) and don’t making any major inroads helping the business to make significant progress in this highly transparent and communicative world. They simply keep failing. We recognized this by seeing an increasing churn in social media positions.

The key reasons for failing are:

  • Lack of a profound social media strategy
  • Lack of comprehensive experience what it means to build a customer engagement
  • Lack of market research skills and reporting
  • Lack of management skills to present a business relevant plan without overwhelming executives with details and technical aspects
  • Lack of skills aligning social media activities with overall business objectives

 

Axel
Http://XeeMe.com/AxelS

 

 

 

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When Your Social Media Scores Suck

There are lots of controversial discussions about scores. To some extend it is personal as people do not want to be measured against something, and yet other highly competitive people love the challenge. The deeper meaning of scoring however is the very basic concept of feedback. It’s a great way to support learning and improving whatever needs to be improved.

Activity Scores

There are many well known activity scores out there such as Klout and Kred and many others. They all evolved and went though a steep learning curve. Today more and more people look at those scores and use them to judge a persons networking and communication skills. Most take it with a grain of salt, yet see it at least as one of several key performance indicators. Activity scores measure the countless events of activities and to a certain degree responses to those activities. Social Media folks have learn to be highly active and through the evolution of the scoring algorithms also learn that pumping out content is not all – getting qualified responses are key and one good dialog is more worth than 100 posts without value. Action and reaction is key in the activity scores.

Return On Engagement

Now – over time business people have developed a great success pattern for themselves, yet struggle to “bring it home”. There is so much valuable content they created but most have a hard time to let every of their connections know where all that content is. It’s literally scattered around the global web. Much of the creative energy is evaporating and only those who are right at the time of the post on the respective network see the content. Everything else remains hidden – unless the user finds a way to always share their entire presence with all the connections on all the contributions with a simple and non intrusive “signature”. This nut was cracked by XeeMe. The more you share your entire social presence the higher is the leverage of the energy you put into content creation. If a user looking at a post, tweet, picture and video you shared and looks at other content you created through the little signature URL you doubled the Return on Engagement.

ROE Score – XeeScore

The XeeScore is a strategic counterpart to the engagement scores and you can see it all around. XeeScore is strategic because having a high engagement level is only have the story. Only having a high return on those engagement is actually bringing the success home. Just envision bringing the users “home” to your entire social presence.

Inbound data
The XeeScore looks at the “inbound visits” meaning people who visit your XeeMe. If they leave right there, you XeeMe is apparently not very attractive or the story that got people there was not so compelling.

Outbound Data
The outbound number are visits that are initiated by clicking on any of your sites on your XeeMe to the respective social presences. If people visit more than one site, you actually experience a great amplification because they see more than one item of your content. That amplification (the ration between inbound and outbound) is a key to a high XeeScore.

Uniques
It tells you how many unique visitors you have to your XeeMe. The more the better for you. And as such the XeeScore increaees with unique visitors.

Amplification
As mentioned before, the ratio between inbound and outbound visits, gives you the “amplification”. An amplification of greater than 1 is already good. An amplification of more than 2 is excellent. An amplification of 0.5 is ok but tells you there is some room for improvement. Below that you should review with peers and friends what they think about the value you contribute and the size of your network.

Tips to grow your score

Verify your social footprint with Google
One interesting idea is to check your google presence by clicking on the Google Search link on your XeeMe. You will find it under the profile tab. If you look at my XeeMe you find a high XeeScore but you also get about 50,000 findings from Google.  You will hardly find anybody with a high Klout score, a high reputation on Google and a low XeeScore. Even though Google is not a social tool you see an interesting correlation on the ROE.

Checking other resources
You will find a lot of helpful tips on the XeeMe website to grow your XeeScore. Check out the resources area

Axel
http://XeeMe.com/AxelS

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Success Pattern — Social Media Agencies

In the past 5 years we’ve seen agencies come and go, raise and fall. A pretty typical scenario for a rapidly growing emerging market. As we helped hundreds of people starting their own company or  re-structuring their existing business, I thought I share my observation. This is not so much about skills but how those companies are seen from the outside.

 

What Worked and what didn’t

1) Portfolio

Successful agencies are having a very clearly defined and for newcomer easy to understand service portfolio. It’s shared right on their website and often has at least ball park pricing. They have often times a clear focus in terms of their offering i.e. Social Media Monitoring, presence setup, or apps development.

Less successful agencies have a high level list of buzz words that you can find everywhere in the web with no way of differentiating them from others. Most of the less successful agencies simply offer “everything” which in today’s stage of social media is very hard to do and very had to trust.

2) Target Audience

Successful agencies defining their range of expertise like B2B or B2C, company size, departmental focus even. Making it easy for a prospect to see a match of needed skills.

Less successful agencies have a “scaleable” offering from helping individuals to global enterprises, support all business disciplines and all industries.

3) References

Successful agencies share some references or at least have some stories without mentioning names or brands and share their experience – typically in a blog with frequent updates. The larger agencies who are working for larger clients have hardly a chance to get an official go for references but the sample stories they supply give important indications.

Less successful agencies are often just blasting out content for their clients without long term success and as such having a hard time to talk about any kind of success.

4)  Experience

Successful agencies share their experience either on their blog or in webinars or other media. Listening and reading about the way they think, how they approach things and what their experience is, is a key to better understand what they would be able to do for clients.

Less successful agencies hardly communicate about what they are doing but typically sharing what others do and say, simply due to lack of experience. While sharing content from others is a great thing to do, there are times one has to open up and put a stake in the ground about their own thinking.

5) Doing Business

Successful agencies make it easy to do business with them by having their phone number and social presence easy to find on all pages and make it very clear what they have to offer, for what type of client and in what industry or market segment.

Less successful agencies have hardly their own social presence listed. Often not even a phone number and it remains unclear what they actually have to offer.

6) Social Presence

Successful agencies have a rather complete social presence and update frequently. Many of the rather successful agencies are also seen on other sites and actually “live” in the social web, but most of the time at customers sites and presences.

Less successful agencies have often times a very good looking presence but spotty updates. If they are busy with one project they have no time taking care of their own presence. Less successful agencies follow more people than following them or have rather equal follower / following, have not much original content on their sites.

 

I purposely didn’t talk about skills as this is a whole different discussion. This post may help those who wonder why it is so hard to get clients, to re-evaluate their representation in the market.

Axel
http://XeeMe.com/AxelS

 

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Social Media and Customer Experience Management

Social Media is widely used in businesses for all kinds of aspects. It typically starts on the marketing side to spread the word and get fast customer feedback. The experience with the customer feedback often times triggers new ideas in market research and Social Media becomes an interesting real time market research instrument.

Service And Support

The other aspect of market feedback are obviously product related questions, complaints or issues. Needless to say that service and support departments are requested to take care of those issues and begin to discover Social Media as a support vehicle. Comcast Cable for instance reported they responded to over hundred thousand support requests on Twitter. Why is that important? Because a support person can read a support request written in 140 character much faster and also respond much faster than in any traditional media.

Product Management

With all the inputs, requests, wishes and ideas compiled in the social web, product management is discovering a new world of product feedback, market research and feature request sources to build better products. Crowd sourcing is the key word. Not only does product management reduce the risk of creating a product release nobody really wants but gets free additional requests that make users happy as they get build. Dell, SalesForce.com and others are leaders in that development.

Sales

Now all that engagement obviously brings sales people into the scene who want to know more what people want, hoping they can offer an even more tailored solution. And as recommendations play an ever more important role, sales people begin to introduce prospects to existing clients in a rather informal and social manner to stimulate those recommendations.

Full Circle Customer Experience

If we look at all this – this is pretty much the full circle customer experience a person can have when dealing with a company. For customer experience management teams social media has become a very strategic playground. Obviously there are still areas that has no touch points with social media like the invoicing process or logistics, but interestingly enough those are rarely strategic problems in the eye of a customer. On the other side, support, product influence and product quality, exchange with other customers, approachability of a team are key items and they are all part of the social media landscape.

 

Understanding the criticality and how to deal with that new field is a big challenge for many CX managers. That’s why we created the CEM training program. http://academy.society3.com/s3-ccems/ The core of the program is developing a CEM strategy leveraging social media that can be implemented in any size company.

Axel
http://XeeMe.com/AxelS

 

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Anatomy of a buzz

The anatomy of a well designed social media buzz is interestingly
close to the anatomy of a virus – hence “viral marketing”.

CONTENT:  You take some important piece of content. That is what is carried around. Make sure it is well structured so it won;t be altered, misunderstood etc.

BASE: Your content need a connection to the base, your social presence, otherwise it floats around and may not even know what is going on.

HOST STICKINESS: You will need hosts for each information “virus”. The message and the campaign need to have some stickiness so it stays with a host for a while and can reproduce there.

FUEL
Make sure you have enough ‘fuel” so your campaign is starving down the road or exhaust to early. The best way is to point back to the base so that it can be refueled.

PRESENCE PROTECTION
Ensure a strong and well protected (managed) presence. Every refueling process needs support and energy. Fuel and refuel the hosts so the virus can continue to reproduce and spread further. Don’t worry to much about mutation –  it will happen anyway.

ATTRACTION
Package some attraction with your initiative. Rewards, recognition, attention, fun…. Support the presence of your hosts. You may have hundreds of hosts if not more :)

Put a buzz to work

Now let’s put this all into a workable social media action plan. You will see it life on Thursday at our Buzz & Awareness Creation event. We will post the details in one of the next posts too.

Creating a buzz isn’t the easiest thing in the world but it is definitely no magic. We will share some of the secrets.

Axel
http://XeeMe.com/AxelS

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This morning, Pinterest introduced ‘Secret Boards’, 5 businesses benefits

What can you do with the new ‘Secret Board’ feature?

When expanding the Pinterest boards a few application came to mind. An individual user may have a lot of things they want to keep entirely private, just for themselves, or sharing it only with family or good friends. But what about business users?

5 Ways a business can benefit from ‘Secret Boards’

Secret boards is actually a great feature for business teams. Every company has lots of company confidential images they share internally but don’t want it to be necessarily floating around in the public.

Company Confidential

You wouldn’t want to upload any real confidential information and you shouldn’t – but think about a library of web images that are publicly seen all over your website and you want to make it easy for the various departments to access them. Think about drawing that are used in your brochures and you want to share them with all your local offices. Or think about images that are used in your training material and you want your training centers in all countries have an easy to access repository with out having them access your servers via high secure lines.

Business Partner Partner Integration

In the early 90′s Partner Portals were a big deal. However most portals are dormant or closed down today. it is just way to complicated for a reseller for instance to maintain portal URLs and access information to their 50 or more vendors. This new feature allows channel managers to share a secret board with their partners and partners have no longer maintain a list of user ids and passwords.

Competition Information

You may want to have a repository about information from your competition but not necessarily share it publicly, yet easy enough for your team to access it.

Agency Collaboration

Another very cool way to use it is together with an advertising or web agency. We all know how painful it is to send images via email. Just have a board shared between agency and the marketing team and discuss the required changes over the phone. Upload a new version and discuss again.

Outsourced Development team

If you have an outsourced development team you will very much appreciate the ability to share a board with the dev team without sending libraries of images across the web and make sure everybody has all updates.

 

Obviously all of that was possible before by maintaining a data server with all the images on it, allow people to dial in via VPN, remain security rules and the necessary security protection – but hey way going through all that pain?

What other applications do you envision using the new feature?

Axel
http://xeeme.com/AxelS

 

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